Want to write a book? How one summer at Camp NaNoWriMo can get you there

Want to write a book? How one summer at Camp NaNoWriMo can get you there

Do you have a writing friend you want to go to camp with? Share this post with them! Camp NaNoWriMo – Even Writers Like Camping… When It’s Online! by Casey Rusinowski, SinnersTongue.com Most of you are probably aware of–and probably fans of–National Novel Writing Month (aka – NaNoWriMo). Oh yeah, of course. It’s in November. But did you know the same folks host an additional month of support and writerly fun in July. Camp NaNoWriMo functions as an online camp a la summer camps of old. Think Bill Murray in Meatballs but with more productivity. Before you ship off to Camp, here are the basics Camp runs July 1 through July 31 but cabins will be assigned June 25 (yes, you heard right, they are actually assigning “cabins” to maintain the feel of being at camp!). If you aren’t interested in being assigned to a new group of writers, have no fear, private cabins became available yesterday. So if you already have a ragtag group of ne’er-do-well writers you trust with your work, you can make that happen. The private cabins hold up to 11 people. Camp NaNoWriMo is not just for novelists Another difference between traditional NaNoWriMo and camp is the broader range of writing projects. If you don’t have a novel you are attempting to complete, but still want to enjoy some camaraderie with your fellow writers, there are a few more options: Nonfiction Poetry Revision Script Short Stories Whether you want to write something new, something short, or revise what you’ve already got, there is a place for you at Camp. The sign-up process is free and...
Crossroads went back to the drawing board and now we have something new to tell you

Crossroads went back to the drawing board and now we have something new to tell you

Earlier this year, we hit a brick wall. The planning for our next Crossroads Writers Conference had gone swimmingly …until it didn’t. Suddenly, the puzzle pieces weren’t fitting together anymore. What happened? We couldn’t get the venue we wanted on the same weekend as the conference hotel we wanted. A tall order, but not an impossible task. And then… we found out two of our favorite (and vital) organizers become mamas this fall. Another beloved Crossroader, a committee chair, gets married in October. There’s always a lot to juggle with the conference because we’re an all-volunteer group, so with this news, the venue/hotel trouble and us Von Braun Hornes now living in Akron, Ohio, the answer seemed clear: step back and re-evaluate. So we’re putting the conference on hiatus until 2015 and going back to the drawing board. The first step in this process was asking our people how we can actually help. What are your goals? What are your roadblocks? What, if anything, have you gotten out of Crossroads in the past? Whenever we’ve asked before, it’s been about the conference. You know, how can we improve it? Now, we’re thinking bigger. How can we help you all year long? What did we learn? A lot, actually. I’ll start with some broad strokes here and where it’s leading us. Then, over the next couple of weeks, I’ll share more in-depth results from the survey. In a nutshell, this is what you told us: #1) Our people have big, awesome, inspiring goals for their writing but often struggle to finish what they start. #2) They want to connect to other people, specifically readers and other writers. #3)...
Our future is in your hands, Dude

Our future is in your hands, Dude

Crossroads is at a crossroads. We need your help again, starting with your honest feedback. Just as we were set to announce the dates and location for the 2014 writers conference, we received unexpected news. It wasn’t BAD news in a cosmic sense but our original plan was kaput. In a nutshell, the problem is that we can’t have all three of these at the same time: the date, the venue and nearby lodging. We have targeted one of either the last two weekends of September or the first two of October. We narrowed it down to two venues that have facilitated our raucous crowd before. We made it a priority to select a hotel as close to the venue as possible–preferably one with both venue and lodging under the same roof. No combination of those things will work out for 2014. But that doesn’t mean we’re disappearing in 2014. (I repeat: We aren’t disappearing.) However, we have to change something. I’m asking you to help us figure out our next steps. Somewhere along the way, we started focusing entirely too much on ourselves, on improving. What do you like about the conference and the speakers and the topics and the food? That’s all still important but there is one question whose answer is at the heart of everything we do: What goals can we help you reach? Until we know, we can’t make a good decision about what we do next. That’s why your help is so crucial. Crossroads was started in the belief we could make the world a better place by helping all kinds of storytellers grow....

Ep. 4 – The Agent-Writer Relationship w/ Carrie Howland & Cat Scully

Play Episode 4 of the Wordy South Social Hour below or click here to download it. It’s no secret that Donadio & Olson agent Carrie Howland is one of our favorites at Crossroads. (We are secretly plotting to keep her.) Likewise,  we quickly became fans of writer/novelist/illustrator Cat Scully, who we first met in 2012 as a Crossroads scholarship recipient. Her story is pretty amazing. In this episode of the Wordy South Social Hour, they talk about the relationship between a writer and an agent, how theirs came to be and what work lays...
Wordy South, Ep. 3: Bernice McFadden & Chuck Wendig

Wordy South, Ep. 3: Bernice McFadden & Chuck Wendig

(NOTE: This is the corrected version of the podcast. The first post was missing a few words. Sorry!) What “lunatic” thing did acclaimed novelist Bernice McFadden do until 2005? And why did she stop? Find out in this interview with the two-time Hurston/Wright Award nominee and author of New York Times editor’s choice book “Gathering of Waters.” She has a ton of great insight to share with writers trying to complete their novel. The next time you think about saying you could care less, be aware pen monkey Chuck Wendig may tap you on the shoulder, eyeball you up and down, and then shake his head, “No, you could care less. And you should.” We play his speech from the 2012 Crossroads so you know why. Shout-outs to a couple of talented writers in the Crossroads family. YA novelist Lauren Morrill, who made Crossroads 2013 awesome and then released her second book–“Being Sloan Jacobs”–on January 7. You can get your copy here. You can see what Lauren looked like in high school here: Delilah S. Dawson, writer of paranormal romance and whatnot, just unleashed “Damsel and the Daggerman,” a new Blud series novella. And, on January 28, you can get your hands on “Wicked After Midnight,” which may or may not be about lonely mogwai who eat dinner too late and have to deal with their emotions as they’re transformed into gremlins. Also, Susannah Breslin is awesome. Find these folks on Twitter: Bernice McFadden, Chuck Wendig, Lauren Morrill, Delilah S. Dawson, Susannah Breslin, Crossroads and Chris Horne Web interviews and blogs: Bernice McFadden – interview How to survive 74 rejections (BONUS: M.W. Gerard’s review of “Glorious”)...
Episode 2: Wordy South Social Hour w/ Max Adams, Chris Baty & Tina McElroy Ansa

Episode 2: Wordy South Social Hour w/ Max Adams, Chris Baty & Tina McElroy Ansa

Wait. There are a lot of folks on this one. You are correct. We’re still test-driving this podcast thing so in this episode, we give you more. Enjoy! So what will you find on the other side of that play button? After a patented Chris Horne ramble, we hear from  Macon-born novelist and filmmaker Tina McElroy Ansa on what she learned from the late John Oliver Killens, the Macon-born co-founder of the Harlem Writers Guild and author of “Youngblood,” in whose honor we named our conference Crossroads. Because we’re nearing the beginning of the New Year and we’re all excited about writing more and writing better–but can always use more motivation–we play a clip from NaNoWriMo founder Chris Baty’s keynote at the 2012 Crossroads Writers Conference.  Then we get to a real jewel: An interview with award-winning screenwriter Max Adams who joins Phillip Ramati for a conversation about telling stories with moving pictures. As promised, here are a bunch of links to more good stuff: Tina McElroy Ansa on the web, on Twitter and at The Moth. John Oliver Killens in the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame. Chris Baty on the web, on Twitter, in his poster shop and at NaNoWriMo. Max Adams on the web, on Twitter, on Amazon where you can buy her book,  and in classes at the Academy of Film Writing. And Susannah Breslin online, on Twitter and at...