Tag Archives: Macon

PHOTO: Delilah S. Dawson, two tiny pumpkins and loads of candy.

(drumroll) Wordy South Social Hour, ep. 1

Technically, it’s still December 19, as I post this.

That’d been the plan: Post the first episode on Thursday, December 19.

But I quickly learned that I don’t know much at all about sound. So, my self-education (thank you, Internet) slowed my progress.

As did things like getting a broken tooth pulled.

Regardless, here’s our first installment. I’m proud of it and no matter how much better these episodes get–and they will get better–I’m always going to love this one.

Here, we kick-off the Wordy South Social Hour podcast the same way we kicked-off the 2013 Crossroads Writers Conference: With a talk by Delilah S. Dawson. (And her shout-out to the awesome Susannah Breslin.)

If you get nothing else out of it–besides how weird she is–remember these four things, which she says are key to being a published writer:

1) Work really hard for a long time.

2) Develop thick skin.

3) Never stop learning.

4) Write every day, even when it drives you crazy.

In a couple weeks or so, we’ll release the episode featuring an interview with Delilah.

For now, enjoy the podcast and let us know what you think. We’ll be posting more from past conferences (I just found a stash from 2011) and including interviews with our favorite folks.

Remember, you can find Delilah online at www.DelilahSDawson.com and follow her on Twitter at @delilahsdawson

Yay!

 

delilah learning em

This is why we love you.

(Or, “What we’re talking about when we blog about love.”)

It’s been a whirlwind week (and some change) since we closed out the fifth (cheers!) Crossroads Writers Conference. In the painful wake of saying “See ya later” to a bunch of friends, new and old, we came together for one last meeting about 2013 with an eye towards year six. The good news, of course, is that we’re all back in for another conference. We’re hitting up potential venues and hotels, checking in with some of our favorite writers and checking out some fresh faces to add to the mix. In the near-ish future, we should be able to announce a date for the 2014 Crossroads Writers Conference.

In the meantime, we’re turning to you to help us make this conference better. While we love all the positive comments, don’t be afraid to tell us what went wrong, how and what we can do to fix it. That’s how we grow. Consider each conference a draft of our latest work. We need the feedback. [And you can offer that in this anonymous survey here -- bit.ly/1aOzQnk -- or by shooting me an email: chris (at) crossroadswriters (dot) org.]

As much fun as we all have at the conference, we recognize that there’s more we can do to help our Crossroads family write more and write better. We’re talking about doing some “Tweet Meets” and webinars and such. But tell us, how can we help keep you motivated? What insight can we wring from our writer friends so you can get past some tough roadblocks? Where can our lil’ community stay alive–and in what ways–while we’re waiting for the next conference?

Make your suggestions in the comments section below, via email, on Twitter or Facebook, by carrier pigeon, on the Wendig beard lice express, or with scrolls tied around arrows shot from atop galloping horses.

PS – Here are some blogs about Crossroads from some of our friends who were kind enough to join us. If you have one of your own to share, please let me know.

Later!

Chris

Blogs about Crossroads:

Tanya Kirkpatrick – “Today I Will Be Brave” – (Follow her on Twitter: @tanyawritesfic)

Jeremy Foshee – “Crossroads, Round Two” – (Follow him on Twitter: @jeremyfoshee)

Delilah S. Dawson – 30 Tips for Surviving Your First (or Any) Writing Conference” – (Follow her on Twitter: @DelilahSDawson) [Bonus Delilah post: "This Weekend"]

Shane Wilson – “But Am I A Writer?” – (Follow him on Twitter: @NomadShane)

Meaghan Walsh Gerard – “Dispatches from Crossroads 2013” – (Follow her on Twitter: @cineastesview)

WS_Badge_Revised

This is why you registered for Crossroads

You come for the classes and the comraderie. If you’re a returning Crossroader, you already expect to have a good time, learn a bunch and leave inspired to write more. Well, here’s a run-down with (almost all) our workshops coming up this weekend.

We dare you not to be excited!

 

 

List of 2013 Crossroads Workshops

 

delilah_slider25 Steps to Being A Traditionally Published Author, Even Lazier Edition

Delilah Dawson

Instead of reading my 7,000-word guide to getting a traditional publishing deal, come listen to me talk about it–and answer the questions you’re afraid to ask. From finishing your first draft to getting an agent to what happens after your book is on the shelf, it’s possible to sell a book without having an MFA, a friend in publishing, or a reality TV show. Hint: it involves a lot of hard work.

 

IMG_1454Anatomy of a Book

Emilie P. Bush

Whether you plan to self publish or enter a deal with a commercial publisher, knowing your gutter from your half title page is important. Topics include publishing terms, an up-close and personal look at what a book interior SHOULD look like and the basic “rules” of layout.

 

Digital Storytelling

Tim Regan-Porter

Should you write differently for digital media? If so, how? What tools are best for telling a compelling story? This panel will address a variety of issues in writing for the web, tablets, and mobile.

 

Fiction Writing Tips

Cate Noble

Deconstructing story: the elements of compelling fiction, with tips for nurturing your writer’s soul.

 

Freelancing is Out; Entrepreurism is In

Kristin Luna

At one point in time (think: way back pre-2010), a writer could simply survive off of freelance assignments. But in 2013, the market has drastically changed and freelancers are forced to evolve with the times. Now, publications expect writers to be a one-stop shop: from the crafting of a story to the photography and right down to publicity and social media promotion. In order to rise to the top of a diluted market, there’s one thing you have to be: an entrepreneur.

 

CarrieHowlandGetting Past The Gatekeeper: How to get your work noticed by an agent

Carrie Howland

Getting an agent is a tricky business, and can seem overwhelming. How do you write the perfect pitch? How do you find the right agent in the first place? How do you stay out of the dreaded slush pile?! Agent Carrie Howland of Donadio & Olson, Inc. will answer these questions and more to help you on your way to finding, and building a lasting relationship with, an agent.

 

How to Build Your Story

Margaret South

Learn the secret of telling a great story. Master your use of turning points to heighten meaning. Give yourself the opportunity to get the story right the first time.

 

If Writing Is Easy, You Ain’t Doing It Right

Joe Kovac Jr.

Tons of pointers, tips, advice and other random nonsense you may or may not need to survive the writing process. (Lesson One: It is anything but a process.) But if you sign up for this session, we’ll discuss the oft-maddening act of turning out page-turning stories, and how to know if you’re pushing yourself enough to do it.

 

Shawn DurhamI Wrote an Awesome Book … and You Can Too

J. Shawn Durham

So you’ve finally written that awesome, super duper, kickass best selling tome, eh? But now that you’ve penned that awesomeness, how are you gonna let the world know about it? Welcome to 21st century authorship, where it’s not just enough to be Next Faulkner, Ellison or Morrisson. You also have to get your I-net game up. You ready?

 

Making History Live (in Fiction)

Anthony Grooms

You’ve researched the historical facts, but how do you blend them into lively fictional scenes? The speaker will discuss strategies for scene writing for historical fiction.

 

Making The Most Out of Murder and Mayhem

Barry Reese

The heyday of the bloody pulps might have been the Thirties and Forties but the movement has gained new legs in recent years with the rise of New Pulp. What is it and why might it be the salvation for small press writers? Award-winning New Pulp author Barry Reese will take you through the ins and outs of the New Pulp world, including where and how you can become a part of it.

 

Never Say No: Building A Portfolio In The Gig Economy

John Rhett Thomas

With expertise in website development, social media, publishing, and project management in the comics industry – both as a writer and an editor – John Rhett Thomas will field questions on a variety of discussion points, including how to get and keep a freelance writing job, operating within the “gig” economy, and working for – and as – an editor. He will also highlight the importance of “never saying no” (with a few caveats) when you start your freelance writing career. And, oh yeah, comic books.

 

Novel Writing 101

Sarah Domet

Have a great idea for a novel, but you can’t seem to get started? Or, have you found yourself halfway through your novel, but stuck and stumped? In this session we’ll explore novel writing basics, from character development to story arc. We’ll take a look at what drives a novel, and we’ll examine techniques and exercises to keep you focused, creative, and working toward the completion of your first draft.

 

Kat+ZhangPlanning the YA Trilogy

Kat Zhang

The three-book structure is getting endemic. But looking at all the cases of “second-book syndrome” and complaints about overstretched plots, do all stories fit neatly in 3 books? And how does one go about selling a trilogy anyway?

 

Poems from Oblique Lexicon

Judson Mitcham

My ongoing project is a collection of poems called Oblique Lexicon. Emily Dickinson said, “Tell all the truth but tell it slant,” and that is the guiding principle of these poems. My session will involve a reading from the collection.

 

David Iserson 210Putting Words in Other People’s Mouths

David Iserson

I wrote a funny young adult novel and my day job is writing for film and television. I’ll discuss how to get started in those various kinds of writing, balancing different projects at once, and if I can get it on the plane, I’ll try to bring candy.

 

Story Telling in a Digital Age

Erick Erickson

The attention span of the average person has shortened considerably in the digital age. Instant on, instant off, and instant change affect the experience of connecting through words. This session will focus on capturing and keeping attention in a digital age.

 

The Author/Editor Collaboration

Marc Jolley

Mercer University Press Editor Marc Jolley will discuss the role of an editor and the ways authors and editors collaborate to make a better book

 

The Not-so Gentler Sex: How to Write Women. And Sex.

Delilah Dawson

Whether you’re trying to help your female lead leap off the page or make sure your hero’s love interest isn’t just a cardboard cut-out, there’s an art to writing women. Which leads us right into romance, sizzling chemistry, and the bedroom. Things might get bawdy, but they’ll stay honest, and this once prudish Southern girl is more than happy to answer all your questions about the inside and outside workings of women in fiction.

 

The Seven Questions That Will Revolutionize Your Writing

Lauretta Hannon

Go straight to the heart of the matter as we explore the most critical lessons and solutions for your project. Expect to be energized and inspired by this lively, thought-provoking session.

 

Submit To Your Editrix: The Pleasure of Dominating Text

Annabelle Carr

The relationship between a writer and her editor can be intense to say the least—yet it can yield transcendent results. As both a consumer nonfiction editor and a literary fiction writer, I’ve put considerable thought into that delicate balance between dominance and submission. In this session, we’ll explore the twisted psyche of the magazine editrix and learn from some of literature’s greatest copyslingers. Think of it as text therapy for your freelance career.

 

BerniceMcFaddenTrusting the Voice: The Art of Listening, Writing and Living

Bernice L. McFadden

It’s easier to trust the creative process when you also trust that a greater force is guiding that process. Bernice L. McFadden discusses her personal journey from aspiring writer to published author by moving beyond fear by believing that a greater force was guiding her creative process.

 

Writer VS. Studio

Adam Torchia

The process of screenplay development in the contemporary movie studio. This will include both the studio and writer’s perspective, the art of navigating the fine line between art and business.

 

Andrew-Hartley-02_-300x214Writing in Multiple Genres

A.J. Hartley

Most successful writers work in only genre, and trying to do otherwise can be dangerous for both your craft and your career. But only writing one kind of book has perils of its own–not least of which is boredom for the author and his or her readers. This session will explore the issues and possible solutions for writers trying to navigate writing and publishing in more than one category.

 

Writing Poems That Get Published

Kelly Whiddon

Want to write poems for a bigger audience than your mom and your cat? This session will tell you how to construct poems that sing off the page and have editors take notice.

 

IMG_1435Writing Stories That Will Sell

Nathan Edmondson

Want to write like it’s your job? Or have a job writing? All you need to do is throw some sex and gunplay into the plot, maybe blow a car or two up, and you’re halfway there. Or is there more to it?

 

 

 

CW_Billboard

Scholarship Sponsors, Radio Spots and Billboards, Oh My!

GPB Radio Macon LogoThanks to a huge boost of support from the local community, this has been a stellar week in Crossroadsland!

WMUM, Macon’s GPB station, is running a new promo for the 5th annual Crossroads Writers Conference. Click here to listen to the Crossroads Stereo Promo.

CW-DIGThe next day, Lamar Advertising gave the conference space on one of its digital billboards overlooking Watson Boulevard so our buddies in Warner Robins will know what’s up.

And in great news for writers-in-need, we picked up two more scholarship sponsors from story-loving organizations and businesses.

The first comes from Historic Macon, whose hard work has preserved the gorgeous historic housing stock that makes our city so unique. Their crown jewel is the Sidney Lanier Cottage, where Macon’s famed poet was born and where you’ll now find the Lanier Center for Literary Arts. So it’s only appropriate that they want to sponsor a budding poet with a Storyteller Deluxe scholarship in honor of ol’ Sidney Lanier.

We’re also able to give away another Pen & Paper scholarship thanks to the generosity of the Law Office of J. Michael Cranford, Lanier Logowho is also helping support Authors’ Avenue on Friday, October 4 in downtown Macon. This one goes to a writer-in-need, doesn’t matter where you live or whether you’re a student. And if you’ve already applied for a scholarship, you’ll be considered for this one too. No need to reapply.

To apply for either scholarship, you need to go to this form and answer all of our unreasonable questions! Click here.

Now, you’re probably wondering about those other scholarships. Who won those?

Well, our anonymous donor has picked two first-time Crossroaders for the Storyteller Deluxe packages and those winners have been notified. We’ll share the good news with you as soon as we confirm with them. Same goes for the two Pen & Paper scholarships in the Middle Georgia State College giveaway.

In the meantime, we’ll leave you with something our anonymous donor said about reading about the passion each of the scholarship applicants have for writing.

“It was a great reminder to ME that I’m not alone in my writing journey.”

And if there’s anything we can guarantee about your experience at Crossroads, it’s that you can find others so you won’t feel alone in your writing journeys either.

 

MGSC Ad cropped

Last weekend for the Pen & Paper giveaway, sponsored by MGSC

MGSC.lgo.rev.box.lft.267Time is running out but the entries keep pouring in. If you want a shot at one of two Pen & Paper registrations, generously sponsored by Middle Georgia State College, you should click here now to enter.

In addition to sending 10 of its students to the 2013 Crossroads Writers Conference, Middle Georgia State College has sponsored these two non-student registrations too.

Increase your chances by entering daily and sharing with your friends. The giveaway ends Monday, September 16, 2013 at 11:59 p.m.

Learn more about tickets for the 2013 Crossroads Writers Conference here.

Check out the schedule for the 2013 Crossroads Writers Conference here.

Stay tuned for more news about Crossroads, including the special Sunday sessions for Storyteller Deluxe ticket holders and this year’s new T-shirt designs!

blog logo

the Crossroads 2013 Schedule

Hello friends, sorry it took us so long. There was just a lot of awesome to cram into one weekend.

When you’re looking it over, remember how the registration works:

  • Short Story ticket gets you in just the Saturday daylight sessions
  • Pen & Paper gets you into Friday and Saturday’s sessions (and it includes lunch)
  • Storyteller Deluxe gets you in Friday, Saturday and Sunday sessions plus your lunch on Saturday and two after-hours socializing events and the new Crossroads shirt.

DOWNLOAD PDFs: FRIDAY SCHEDULE | SATURDAY SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4

 

1 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. – Welcome & Keynote by Delilah Dawson

 

1:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m. – Breakout Block 1

Room A – Writing Stories about Ordinary People – Ed Grisamore

Room B – Freelancing – Anabelle Carr

Room C – Never Say No: Building A Portfolio In The Gig Economy – Rhett Thomas

 

2:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. – Breakout Block 2

Room A – If Writing Is Easy, You Ain’t Doing It Right – Joe Kovac

Room B – The Writer/Editor Collaboration – Marc Jolley

Room C – Writing Stories That Will Sell – Nathan Edmondson

 

3:30 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. – Breakout Block 3

Room A – Digital Storytelling – Tim Regan-Porter

Room B – Fiction Writing and Promotion – Shawn Durham

Room C – Literary Agent Q&A – Carrie Howland

 

4:15 p.m. – 6 p.m. – FREE TIME

 

6 p.m. – 8 p.m. – Author’s Avenue: Readings, Signings, Music & More in Downtown Macon

 

8:30 p.m. – 10 p.m. – Social Hour for Authors & Storyteller Deluxe Ticket Holders

 

 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5

 

7:30 a.m. – Registration opens

8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m. – Opening remarks

8:45 a.m. – 9:15 a.m. – An Author Meets Her Agent: A conversation with Cat Scully & Carrie Howland

9:30 a.m. – 10:15 Breakout Block 1

Room A – Revising Your Teenage Voice – Lauren Morrill

Room B – Advice from a Writing Coach – Sarah Domet

Room C – The 7 Questions That Will Revolutionize Your Writing – Lauretta Hannon

Room D – Fiction Panel: Bernice McFadden, Cate Noble and Anthony Grooms

Room E – Poems from the Oblique Lexicon – Judson Mitcham

 

10:30 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Breakout Block 2

Room A – Young Adult Fiction – David Iserson

Room B – Making History Live – Anthony Grooms

Room C – Poetry – Kevin Coval

Room D – The Writing Life Panel : Carrie Howland, Sarah Domet, Emilie Bush and Marc Jolley

Room E – Writing Stories That Sell – Nathan Edmonson

 

 

11:30 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. Breakout Block 3

Room A – Making the Most Out of Murder and Mayhem – Barry Reese

Room B – How to Build Your Story – Margaret South

Room C – Freelancing Is Out, Entrepreneurship Is in – Kristin Luna

Room D – Young Adult Fiction Panel: David Iserson, AJ Hartley, Jackson Pearce, Kat Zhang and Lauren Morrill

Room E – Fiction Writing Tips – Cate Noble

 

***12:15-2:00 Lunch in Mercer Village with Authors & Guest***

Pen & Paper and Storyteller Deluxe ticket holders get $10 lunch voucher for Mercer Village restaurants

 

2:15 p.m. – 3 p.m. Breakout Block 4

Room A – The Not-So Gentler Sex: How to Write Women. And Sex. – Delilah Dawson

Room B – Literary Agent Q&A – Carrie Howland

Room C – Young Adult Fiction – Jackson Pearce

Room D – Freelance Panel: Kristin Luna, Annabelle Carr, and Leila Regan-Porter

Room E – Writing Poems That Get Published – Kelly Whiddon

 

3:15 p.m. – 4 p.m. Breakout Block 5

Room A- Writing in Multiple Genres – AJ Hartley

Room B – Graphic Novels with Rhett Thomas

Room C – Writer vs. Studio with Adam Torchia

Room D – Journalism & New Media Panel: Erick Erickson, Tim Regan-Porter and Adam Ragusea

Room E – 25 Steps to Being a Traditionally Published Author (Even Lazier Edition) – Delilah Dawson

 

4:15 p.m. – 5 p.m. Breakout Block 6

Room A – Planning the YA Trilogy with Kat Zhang

Room B - Storytelling in the Digital Age – Erick Erickson

Room C – Anatomy of a Book with Emilie Bush

Room D – Screenwriting Panel with David Iserson and Adam Torchia

Room E – Trusting the Voice: the Art of Listening, Writing and Living – Bernice McFadden

 

5 p.m. – 6 p.m. – Author Book Signing

Short Story

What’s the “Short Story” ticket?

Short Story

You have spoken and we have listened. Several of our folks said they can’t get off work early on Friday and they wanted a Saturday-only ticket, which is what we’ve just created: the “Short Story” ticket. Now, for just $99, you can get into all our daytime Saturday sessions, panels and talks.

Unfortunately, the Short Story ticket doesn’t include the lunch voucher and it won’t get you into our special sessions on Friday and Sunday, but if you’re on a tight schedule and need to keep a close eye on your budget, this is a deal that’s hard to beat.

And stay tuned… the full schedule comes out today!

Location, location, location!

This is Macon in the early 1900's... it has changed (some) since then. Now, everything is in beautiful Technicolor!

This is Macon in the early 1900′s… it has changed (some) since then. Now, everything is in beautiful Technicolor!

Where is the Crossroads Writers Conference?

This year, the conference returns to the Macon, Georgia campus of Mercer University. A lot has changed around the college since we were last there. Namely, the growth of Mercer Village, which features a great little coffee shop Jittery Joe’s, a Barnes and Noble, and some great places to grab a bite: Ingleside Village Pizza, Francar’s Wings, Margarita’s Mexican Grill and Fountain of Juice. Don’t forget the large and lovely Tattnall Square Park next door, so if you need a few minute to wander around and collect your thoughts, you can find solitude there. To find your way to Mercer University, just click here, hit “get directions” and type in your address.

Is there an official hotel for us to stay in this year?

Yep! The brand spankin’ new Holiday Inn North is the official hotel of the Wordy South. They have writer-friendly rates (get a great discount off their regular prices when you ask for the Crossroads Writers room deal), a great bar for after-hours hanging out and we’ll run a shuttle from the hotel to the conference to make sure you get where the other word nerds are.

Wait… where is Macon, Georgia?

Right smack dab in the middle of the state, about an hour and a half south of Atlanta and about three hours west of Savannah, conveniently situated on I-75 and I-16.

Macon native John Oliver Killens was a co-founder of the Harlem Writers Guild and the author of several novels, like "Youngblood" and "And Then We Heard the Thunder." Photo: Carl Van Vechten

Macon native John Oliver Killens wrote several novels, like “Youngblood” and “And Then We Heard the Thunder.” (Photo: Carl Van Vechten)

The cool part is that Macon has long been a little creative haven that has been home to a variety of writers, musicians, filmmakers and artists who have make a global impact with their work. We’re talking about John Oliver Killens, the Macon-born co-founder of the Harlem Writers Guild in whose honor the conference is named, and poet/musician/lawyer/soldier Sidney Lanier and novelist Tina McElroy Ansa, Joel Chandler Harris (aka – Uncle Remus) and former CNN president Tom Johnson  and Pulitzer Prize winner George Weller who settled in here after becoming the first journalist into Nagasaki after the atomic bomb was dropped.

We’re talking about Flannery O’Connor who would make the short drive over from Milledgeville, and about Alice Walker, who grew up in Eatonton and still has kin here. And, of course, we’re talking about Otis Redding, Little Richard, the Allman Brothers, James Brown, Lena Horne, Lucinda Williams and her poet daddy Miller Williams. We’re even talking about Mike Mills and Bill Berry of REM, Jason Aldean, Young Jeezy and Meiko. We’re talking about visits to the old cotton mills by Sherwood Anderson and the summer Tennessee Williams spent here, which inspired Big Daddy in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.”

We could go on, but you get the drift, right? It’s a cool little place to come recharge your creative batteries.

Here are some links to help you learn more about Macon:

Macon Arts – Ovations365 

Macon-Bibb County Convention and Visitors Bureau

College Hill Alliance

Historic Macon

Gateway Macon

NewTown Macon

City of Macon

Bibb County

Main Street Macon

Why go to Crossroads? Because Meaghan says so!

Check out Meaghan's blog at MWGerard.com!

Check out Meaghan’s blog at MWGerard.com!

Our friend Meaghan Walsh Gerard is a writer. When we met her, she was working and living the nonprofit life, which is about as lucrative as being a writer. That’s to say not much. And though she didn’t get one of our full scholarships, she did get a partial scholarship, funded largely by our awesome community of writers, because we knew we needed her to join us last year.

What a great decision on our part! When you meet her at this year’s conference, you’ll know exactly why too! She has a ton of fire and a bunch of talent. Best yet, she has that follow-through we adore at Crossroads, which is to say she’s a good influence on a few of us slackers (ahem, Chris).

Here’s an except about what she had to say about her experience, meeting Crossroads organizers and mingling with our all-star lineup of professional writers — and why she thinks you should join us this year. Meaghan, thank you! (To read the whole dang thing and to check out more of her work, go to MWGerard.com.)

The act of writing is solitary but I never knew writing could be so friendly. There is no competitive jealousy at Crossroads. Everyone I met and talked to wanted to better their own process and was genuinely interested in each other’s projects. And for the first time ever, I won NaNoWriMo that November. …If you like writing, GO… …It’s a celebration of the written word. It’s the annual reminder for those of us who need the encouragement to keep writing during those subway commutes and while the dinner is cooking. It’s Thanksgiving, that once a year reunion, we gather around the table, tell stories, eat* too much, and promise to keep in touch (which we do!).

reality_is_overrated_kallis_501_1024x1024.jpg  500×667

Post Up: The Baty Booster Shot

It’s only been four months since Chris Baty delivered his moving keynote speech at Crossroads 2012. In the time since, many of you have started and completed novels during November for NaNoWriMo. We’ve been quietly working on ways to up our game in 2013. (More on that soon, we promise.)

And Mr. Baty? Well, he’s taken his inspirational ways another step further.

First, if you want to hear his speech again, here it is for your listening pleasure. (Videos from the conference are coming soon… ish.)

Between globetrotting and working hard at his own writing, Chris Baty has also opened a little Internet shop of wonders, which you can–and dang sure better–check out here. There you will find posters and signs with that special Chris Baty touch of sincere care and interest in you as a person and a writer.

Grab one and close your eyes, hear his motivational words echo around your head and remember that he believes in you so you should too. Then get to writing.

And then write some more.

And more.

Make us all proud.