Ep. 4 – The Agent-Writer Relationship w/ Carrie Howland & Cat Scully

Play Episode 4 of the Wordy South Social Hour below or click here to download it. It’s no secret that Donadio & Olson agent Carrie Howland is one of our favorites at Crossroads. (We are secretly plotting to keep her.) Likewise,  we quickly became fans of writer/novelist/illustrator Cat Scully, who we first met in 2012 as a Crossroads scholarship recipient. Her story is pretty amazing. In this episode of the Wordy South Social Hour, they talk about the relationship between a writer and an agent, how theirs came to be and what work lays...
Q&A: Carrie Howland, Agent, Donadio & Olson, Inc.

Q&A: Carrie Howland, Agent, Donadio & Olson, Inc.

If you missed Carrie the first time, don’t worry because she’s back for Crossroads 2013! Click here to register: CrossroadsWriters.splashthat.com The Mind of an Agent: Chatting with Carrie Howland of Donadio & Olson Chris: I’m always curious about how people end up where they are. How’d you become an agent? Had you always set out to do it, or did you happen into it? Carrie: I grew up in a small town in Michigan where an ‘agent’ was someone who sold you insurance. I attended a private liberal arts school for undergrad, on Biology/Environmental Research and Pre-Med Scholarships. (I’m probably one of the few literary agents who has taken, and passed, two semesters of Organic Chemistry.) The ‘mistake’ of course was taking Creative Writing 101 to fulfill an art requirement. I’d always loved to write and began reading (more like devouring) books at the age of three, much to the chagrin of my kindergarten teacher who didn’t know what to do with me two years later. After declaring a Creative Writing major, I still fulfilled all my Pre-Med requirements (and even added Pre-Law, ‘just to be safe’). Then I decided to spend a semester off-campus. By this time, I’d become the Poetry Editor of our campus literary journal (which drew submissions from across the country) as well as a reporter for the campus newspaper. So, to me, it made sense to study ‘abroad’…in New York City. I asked to be placed at a publishing house as an editorial intern or at a literary journal. My NY program advisor called one day and, in the thickest New York accent I’d...