It’s Not Even Past: Tina McElroy Ansa, Terry Kay, Lauretta Hannon & Robert Perry Ivey

It’s Not Even Past: Tina McElroy Ansa, Terry Kay, Lauretta Hannon & Robert Perry Ivey

SAVE BIG ON THE CONFERENCE AND GET GREAT SWAG WITH A REGISTRATION PACKAGE At Crossroads 2011, we assembled a few really interesting panels but this one featuring novelist Tina McElroy Ansa, novelist Terry Kay, memorist Lauretta Hannon and poet Robert Perry Ivey still has people talking. Maybe that’s because it was a panel dedicated to Southern writing (thus the Faulkner quote) or, because Tina and Perry are Macon natives, Lauretta hails from Warner Robins and Terry Kay is published by Mercer University Press. Either way, you’re sure to find a few nuggets of knowledge in these snippets. GET MORE GREAT INSIGHT LIKE THIS BY PRE-ORDERING THE CROSSROADS GUIDE TO THE WRITING LIFE & SUPPORTING SCHOLARSHIPS FOR WRITERS-IN-NEED Tina McElroy Ansa answers a question about what she learned from another famed Macon native, John Oliver Killens, who co-founded the Harlem Writers Guild and inspired the name of our conference in his novel, “Youngblood,” set in Macon’s fictional counterpart, Crossroads, Georgia. Asked whether Southern writers are mired in stigma when they leave the region, poet Robert Perry Ivey says sure, maybe… but have fun with it. Memorist Lauretta  Hannon talks about working as a Southern writer with a New York publicist. Novelist Terry Kay talks about how he approaches writing as a Southerner and the privileges a Southern writer used to...
Talkin’ Business With the Queen: an interview with Lauretta Hannon

Talkin’ Business With the Queen: an interview with Lauretta Hannon

Talkin’ Business with The Queen by Beth Ward   I have had the pleasure of keeping Lauretta Hannon’s company exactly two times, and both of those times she was sporting fire-engine red lipstick, with leopard print sunglasses perched on top of her head. Nothing about this look was contrived; in fact, she was The Cracker Queen personified – right down to a laugh that bellowed out of her in loud, unapologetic waves, causing her head to tilt back as if to make room for its sound. It is a rare thing to be in the company of someone so utterly authentic. Fans of her memoir have responded not only to its brash, down-home humor, but also to its warmth and honesty. For many of us adoring fans, it is not a stretch to place ourselves right within its pages, living out scenes of our own lives. Perhaps it is these things that can be credited for “The Cracker Queen”’s success; perhaps it is Ms. Lauretta herself. Either way, we have all fallen in love with her and her joyful, jagged life. I had the opportunity to pick The Queen’s brain a bit in lieu of her Crossroad’s appearance this year, and as always, she left me laughing and aching to write. BW: To begin, when did you know writing was what you wanted to do? LH: I’ve always had a hungering to write, but I didn’t always know that I was “good enough” to do it well.   BW: I think that’s the main problem emerging writers struggle with – just getting over that fear, because there’s always someone...