3 exciting reasons not to feel lonely in 2014

3 exciting reasons not to feel lonely in 2014

I’ll be honest. I miss you all. Just a couple months ago, we had our fifth–and I think, best–Crossroads Writers Conference and it was chock full of awesome, but now I’m lonely again. It happens every year. I just never get used to it. This time, I decided to do something about it. That’s why I’m happy to tell you about three things we’re doing between now and the next conference that gives me a great excuse to talk/text/email/pester you.  (Yes, you!) #1) the Wordy South podcast Do you like things that are free? I do too! That’s the deal with podcasts. Download ’em for free then go workout, take a walk, stream it in your car on long rides. You may think they’re soooo 2005 but I love ’em. That’s why we’re launching our own on Thursday, December 19, 2013. Every week, there’ll be a new installment featuring some of our favorite guests from past conferences, members of the Crossroads family and writers new to the whole Wordy South thing. You’ll find each episode online, via iTunes, Stitcher, Soundcloud and whatever else we can get set up. Our first guests include Bernice McFadden, Adam Mansbach, Carrie Howland, Delilah S. Dawson and Cat Scully. We’ve got a couple of surprise guests and dozens of cool folks from the five previous conferences so this is going to be fun.   #2) Webinars, tweet-ups and Hangouts, oh my! Early in 2014, we’re re-launching this website. The idea is to keep regular blogs with tips, advice, insight, prompts and whatever else we can think of to help keep you motivated. But we’re also working...

Location, location, location!

Where is the Crossroads Writers Conference? This year, the conference returns to the Macon, Georgia campus of Mercer University. A lot has changed around the college since we were last there. Namely, the growth of Mercer Village, which features a great little coffee shop Jittery Joe’s, a Barnes and Noble, and some great places to grab a bite: Ingleside Village Pizza, Francar’s Wings, Margarita’s Mexican Grill and Fountain of Juice. Don’t forget the large and lovely Tattnall Square Park next door, so if you need a few minute to wander around and collect your thoughts, you can find solitude there. To find your way to Mercer University, just click here, hit “get directions” and type in your address. Is there an official hotel for us to stay in this year? Yep! The brand spankin’ new Holiday Inn North is the official hotel of the Wordy South. They have writer-friendly rates (get a great discount off their regular prices when you ask for the Crossroads Writers room deal), a great bar for after-hours hanging out and we’ll run a shuttle from the hotel to the conference to make sure you get where the other word nerds are. Wait… where is Macon, Georgia? Right smack dab in the middle of the state, about an hour and a half south of Atlanta and about three hours west of Savannah, conveniently situated on I-75 and I-16. The cool part is that Macon has long been a little creative haven that has been home to a variety of writers, musicians, filmmakers and artists who have make a global impact with their work. We’re talking...
Three reasons to enter a writing contest

Three reasons to enter a writing contest

Take the next big step in your writing journey by joining the community at Crossroads 2013. Learn more here: CrossroadsWriters.splashthat.com You’ve been dedicated. You’ve scribbled, drafted, edited, revised and polished. You’ve even given your work over to trusted friends for feedback. Now, you want to see your writing stand up on its own two and walk. Maybe run. So, have you checked out writing contests? Here are three good reasons to consider entering one: A deadline – Even the pros with scores of books under their belts suffer from either procrastinating to write or never finishing their revisions. Having a hard and fast deadline can be a good cure for either problem. Gut check – Most contests cost something up front — usually between $15-$35 — but that should serve as a mini-moment of truth. Is your writing ready for public consumption? And is this contest the right one for your work? Payoff – Yes, winning a contest has its benefits — publication, a little cash and an ego boost — but even if you don’t land the prize, you should be proud because you wrote; you polished; you gave it a shot. The only failures are when you aren’t trying. If you’re looking for a writing contest to enter — be it for short stories, poetry, non-fiction and essays, etc — check these websites for some of the best: GlimmerTrain.com – The good folks at Glimmer Train are among the biggest supporters of new, emerging writers. They only publish the unpublished and have  a nice variety of contest options. Good place to start. Poets & Writers – This huge database...

What folks say (pt 2)

  I had such a fantastic time, I thought my head would explode. It was so fun talking shop during the sessions and listening to what other writers had to say about All Things Writing. I met some true characters, too, I tell you. All and all, I had a fantastic time. Macon is such a cool place, too. —  Sarah Domet, a Crossroads guest writer, about her experience: Crossroads succeeded in convincing me that whether or not I ever published a word, I was a writer. …My fantasy romance ‘Miami Days & Truscan (K)nights’ hits the e-book market in April, 2012. My crime thriller ‘Down Home’ hits the e-book market in September 2012. Not too shabby for somebody who was never going to submit again, I don’t think. Crossroads was my start. It didn’t make me a writer. It made me believe I was a writer. And that, my friends, is crucial when attempting to enter the professional publishing world. — Gail Roughton Branan, newly published writer (flowersonthefence.blogspot.com) This weekend I was very nearly spoiled to death at the Crossroads Writers Conference. They made much of me, and fed me on grilled salmon, and did such a great job with promo… On top of the good crowd and the spoiling and the salmon, the bookstore sold so many of my books they ran out of one title and were down to a single copy of another… I came away feeling like the princess of Macon, and my head was puffy and so large it wobbled like a newborn’s outsize melon. – Joshilyn Jackson, New York Times Bestselling novelist,...