Want to write a book? How one summer at Camp NaNoWriMo can get you there

Want to write a book? How one summer at Camp NaNoWriMo can get you there

Do you have a writing friend you want to go to camp with? Share this post with them! Camp NaNoWriMo – Even Writers Like Camping… When It’s Online! by Casey Rusinowski, SinnersTongue.com Most of you are probably aware of–and probably fans of–National Novel Writing Month (aka – NaNoWriMo). Oh yeah, of course. It’s in November. But did you know the same folks host an additional month of support and writerly fun in July. Camp NaNoWriMo functions as an online camp a la summer camps of old. Think Bill Murray in Meatballs but with more productivity. Before you ship off to Camp, here are the basics Camp runs July 1 through July 31 but cabins will be assigned June 25 (yes, you heard right, they are actually assigning “cabins” to maintain the feel of being at camp!). If you aren’t interested in being assigned to a new group of writers, have no fear, private cabins became available yesterday. So if you already have a ragtag group of ne’er-do-well writers you trust with your work, you can make that happen. The private cabins hold up to 11 people. Camp NaNoWriMo is not just for novelists Another difference between traditional NaNoWriMo and camp is the broader range of writing projects. If you don’t have a novel you are attempting to complete, but still want to enjoy some camaraderie with your fellow writers, there are a few more options: Nonfiction Poetry Revision Script Short Stories Whether you want to write something new, something short, or revise what you’ve already got, there is a place for you at Camp. The sign-up process is free and...
Is Your Story Getting in the Way of Your Writing?

Is Your Story Getting in the Way of Your Writing?

  So, a couple weeks ago, I started re-reading a book called “Redirect” by Timothy D. Wilson. It promotes the “story editing” approach to life, which should be perfect for a writer, right? But Wilson isn’t offering insights about writing, per se. His book is about psychology and neuroscience, not novels. And still, it is about narratives. Here’s an excerpt from Wilson’s interview with Scientific American: We all have personal stories about who we are and what the world is like. These stories aren’t necessarily conscious, but they are the narratives by which we live our lives. Many of us have healthy, optimistic stories that serve us well. But sometimes, people develop pessimistic stories and get caught in self-defeating thinking cycles, whereby they assume the worst and, as a result, cope poorly.  You (and I) have heard a bazillion times that “writers write” so get off your butt and just write. So why aren’t you (or I) writing? After the conferences and workshops and talks and great blog posts and all that motivation… why aren’t you writing? Once you’ve rocked out (or not) for a month doing NaNoWriMo why aren’t you still writing in December or January, February, March, etc.? Could it be the story you tell yourself about who you are? Maybe it’s because you’re looking at your stumbles and thinking, “I’m just not supposed to be a writer.” Or, maybe it’s because you’re telling yourself bad stories, like the situation has to be right, that you must first be inspired, that you will as soon as… But, Chris, there’s not enough time in the day. Believe me, I...
Q&A: Carrie Howland, Agent, Donadio & Olson, Inc.

Q&A: Carrie Howland, Agent, Donadio & Olson, Inc.

If you missed Carrie the first time, don’t worry because she’s back for Crossroads 2013! Click here to register: CrossroadsWriters.splashthat.com The Mind of an Agent: Chatting with Carrie Howland of Donadio & Olson Chris: I’m always curious about how people end up where they are. How’d you become an agent? Had you always set out to do it, or did you happen into it? Carrie: I grew up in a small town in Michigan where an ‘agent’ was someone who sold you insurance. I attended a private liberal arts school for undergrad, on Biology/Environmental Research and Pre-Med Scholarships. (I’m probably one of the few literary agents who has taken, and passed, two semesters of Organic Chemistry.) The ‘mistake’ of course was taking Creative Writing 101 to fulfill an art requirement. I’d always loved to write and began reading (more like devouring) books at the age of three, much to the chagrin of my kindergarten teacher who didn’t know what to do with me two years later. After declaring a Creative Writing major, I still fulfilled all my Pre-Med requirements (and even added Pre-Law, ‘just to be safe’). Then I decided to spend a semester off-campus. By this time, I’d become the Poetry Editor of our campus literary journal (which drew submissions from across the country) as well as a reporter for the campus newspaper. So, to me, it made sense to study ‘abroad’…in New York City. I asked to be placed at a publishing house as an editorial intern or at a literary journal. My NY program advisor called one day and, in the thickest New York accent I’d...
Delilah S Dawson: The advice would I give myself if I could go back in time…

Delilah S Dawson: The advice would I give myself if I could go back in time…

We tasked the awesome and cool Delilah S. Dawson with applying her ample imagination to this question: If you could go back in time to the very start of your writing career, what advice would you give yourself? Considering how far this Pocket/Simon & Schuster published author of “Wicked as They Come” and associated editor for CoolMomPicks.com has come, we thought it was a perfect question to have her answer. When you come to the conference, you’ll be treated to more of Delilah’s insight (she may or may not wave a cupcake). Specifically, she’s going to speak on being “shipwrecked” as a writer and what to do with yourself while you’re waiting on your writing ship to come. Until then… enjoy!...